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University Catalog
    Western Washington University
   
 
  Nov 21, 2017
 
 
    
2017-2018 Catalog

All-University Programs


Western Washington University is organized into seven colleges and a Graduate School. This organization not only accommodates Western’s size and complexity, but also enables flexibility and innovation in Western’s curriculum.

Some programs at Western are available through one department or college; some are interdisciplinary, involving several academic units; and some, the All-University Programs listed below, involve all or most of Western’s departments and colleges.

Institute for Global Engagement

360-650-7544
international.wwu.edu

The Institute for Global Engagement (IGE) serves Washington State by providing internationally-focused educational experiences that prepare students to be global citizens and by supporting faculty and staff who are engaged inter-culturally.

The International Studies Minor is housed in IGE, with the executive director of the institute serving as academic advisor and the International Studies Curriculum Committee advising on the minor’s content and focus. The institute also coordinates Western’s international partnerships with institutions around the world and works with faculty on internationalization initiatives at Western.

The Education Abroad office and International Student and Scholar Services are both located in IGE.

Education Abroad

The Education Abroad office offers students study abroad opportunities around the world, where students can take major and minor classes in English, study a foreign language, or explore new subjects. Classes can be taken for credit, and financial aid and scholarships are available. Students can study abroad for one or more quarters during the academic year and summer. Other opportunities include internships, teaching, field study, and volunteering abroad.

For more information, contact the Education Abroad office, Miller Hall 208, 360-650-3298, EdAbroad@wwu.edu; studyabroad.wwu.edu.

Global Learning Programs

Global Learning Programs are courses designed by WWU faculty within their departments that are discipline-specific or interdisciplinary, and often apply to a student’s major or minor.  Courses may include field studies and service learning. Global Learning Programs are led by WWU faculty throughout the year to different countries around the world.

For more information, contact the Education Abroad office in Miller Hall 208, 360-650-3298, EdAbroad@wwu.edu; studyabroad.wwu.edu. 

International Student and Scholar Services

The ISSS Office serves international students, faculty and scholars at Western by providing orientation sessions, advising, and co-curricular activities as well as preparation and maintenance of immigration records. In coordination with other university offices and community resources, ISSS also assists with resolving financial, personal, academic, and employment issues for Western’s international population.

For more information, contact International Student and Scholar Services, Miller Hall 212, 360-650-6517; www.wwu.edu/isss.

Center for Service-Learning

360-650-7542
www.wwu.edu/csl

Service-learning is an experiential learning method in which students learn through active participation in meaningful service experiences that meet community needs. Service-learning offers students the opportunity to learn outside the classroom, explore the richness and diversity of their community, and examine social justice issues while applying classroom theory in a community setting.

The Center for Service-Learning provides resources, including training and program support, to students, faculty, and community partner organizations.

Western offers many courses that include service-learning; look for the SL designation on Classfinder or contact the Center to learn more.

Field Experience Programs

Western Washington University recognizes that work experience outside of the classroom can enhance student learning by providing opportunities to put theory into practice. To this end, the University works closely with a wide variety of businesses and community and governmental agencies which offer internship opportunities, and many academic departments require or make academic credit available for field experience.

Students interested in exploring field experience opportunities should contact the Career Services Center, Old Main 280.

Pre-Professional Pathways

Admission to graduate professional schools requires a baccalaureate degree and is competitive. Early consultation with the relevant advisor and excellent academic work are crucial to success.

Chiropractic

Currently, there are 15 programs and institutions accredited by the Council on Chiropractic Education. Students commonly prepare for entry to a Doctor of Chiropractic (DC) program by obtaining a baccalaureate degree along with completing requirements as specified by targeted programs: prerequisite course work and obtaining observational, volunteer, and/or clinical experience under the direction of a chiropractor.

Students may complete undergraduate degrees in any area; no specific major is preferred or encouraged. Admission requirements are highly variable with many schools allowing for completion of set quarter hours accumulated across life and physical sciences disciplines rather than mandating specific courses to complete. Common requirements include courses and related lab work in biology, inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, and physics, along with a breath of Humanities and Social Science (GUR) studies.

Information about the field can be obtained from the American Chiropractic Association website, www.acatoday.org. Most programs base their requirements for admission on prerequisites established by the Council on Chiropractic Education (CCE). Access to accredited schools and their admission requirements are featured on its website at cce-usa.org. Students should review programs they wish to qualify for early in their academic planning in order to guide their development of a plan of study, including selection of GUR coursework.

Students are encouraged to seek advisement from the pre-healthcare professions advisors. Early and ongoing consultation with the advisors is strongly recommended to discuss matters such as selection of a major, course sequences, shadowing, graduation requirements, application procedures, and other pertinent information.

Typical freshman year curriculum:

  • CHEM 121, 122, 123 (begin 121 as soon as possible)
  • BIOL 204, 205 (continues into second year)
  • ENG 101
  • MATH (level depends upon chosen major)
  • General University Requirements (to include Psychology, Communication)

Pre-chiropractic students should also seek advising in their major department.

Advisors: Dr. George Kriz, Director of Advising for Pre-Healthcare Professions, George.Kriz@wwu.edu; Renée Murray and Anna Tognazzini, Graduate and Pre-Professional Programs Advisors, Renee.Murray@wwu.edu, Anna.Tognazzini@wwu.edu; Old Main 280, 360-650-4240; www.wwu.edu/careers/peacehealth.shtml

Dentistry

Admission to dental schools is highly selective and includes evaluation of GPA, letters of recommendation, scores from the Dental Admission Test (DAT), and an interview, as well as demonstrated dental knowledge, manual dexterity, and community service.

Course requirements for entry into a dental program afford each applicant an opportunity to pursue any area of interest as a major field of study and still acquire the background necessary to prepare for the DAT and to pursue a dental curriculum. The DAT must be taken at least one full year prior to admission to dental school; normally it is taken in the junior year.

Early consultation with the pre-healthcare professions advisors is strongly recommended. Students will find it valuable to engage in early and regular discussions of matters such as selection of a major, course sequences community service, shadowing, and graduation requirements at Western, as well as dental school entrance requirements, application procedures, the DAT, mock interview, and other pertinent information.

Typical freshman year curriculum:

  • CHEM 121, 122, 123 (begin 121 as soon as possible)
  • BIOL 204, 205, 206 (continues into second year)
  • ENG 101
  • MATH (pre-calculus or calculus, depending upon major)
  • General University Requirements

Pre-dentistry students should also seek advising in their major department.

Advisors: Dr. George Kriz, Director of Advising for Pre-Healthcare Professions, George.Kriz@wwu.edu; Renée Murray and Anna Tognazzini, Graduate and Pre-Professional Programs Advisors, Renee.Murray@wwu.edu, Anna.Tognazzini@wwu.edu; Old Main 280, 360-650-4240; www.wwu.edu/careers/prehealth_dentistry.shtml.

Law

Law schools require a baccalaureate degree. They do not require a specific undergraduate major, but do seek students who are broadly educated. Admission is selective based primarily on GPA, LSAT scores and letters of recommendation. Law schools want students who excel in oral and written communication; understand economic, political and social institutions; and have well-developed objective and critical thinking skills. Western’s General University Requirements are intended to aid students in honing these skills.

The Law School Admission Test (LSAT), normally required of applicants to American and Canadian law schools, is offered on the Western campus several times each year. Applications and test schedule information may be obtained from the Testing Center and the Department of Political Science. Students should plan to take the LSAT late in their junior year or early in their senior year.

Students are encouraged to explore academic and extracurricular opportunities provided by Fairhaven College’s Center for Law, Diversity and Justice (CLDJ). All WWU students are eligible to apply to join the Law, Diversity and Justice minor, and Fairhaven students are eligible to pursue a Law, Diversity and Justice concentration (major). For more information on the Center for Law, Diversity and Justice and the LDJ curriculum, contact Prof. Julie A. Helling, Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies.

Advisors: Dr. Paul Chen, Department of Political Science, Arntzen Hall 436, 360-650-4876, Paul.Chen@wwu.edu; Julie A. Helling, Fairhaven College, FA 311, 360-650-4907, Julie.Helling@wwu.edu.

Medicine

The faculties of the School of Medicine at the University of Washington and other medical and osteopathic schools in the U.S. believe that the appropriate level of scholarly achievement and preparation for medicine can best be developed in a liberal arts program with the emphasis on a discipline selected by the student.

In recognition of the diverse opportunities afforded the graduate in medicine, specified entrance requirements are purposely kept to a minimum. This enables each student to pursue, as a major field of study, almost any area of interest — the arts, humanities, social sciences, biological or physical sciences — and still acquire the background necessary to prepare for the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) and to pursue a medical curriculum. The MCAT must be taken at least one full year prior to admission to medical school; normally it is taken in the junior year.

Early consultation with the pre-healthcare professions advisors is strongly recommended. Students will find it valuable to engage in early and regular discussions of matters such as selection of a major, course sequences, community service, physician shadowing, and graduation requirements at Western, as well as medical school entrance requirements, application procedures, the MCAT, mock interview, and other pertinent information.

Typical freshman year curriculum:

  • CHEM 121, 122, 123 (begin 121 as soon as possible)
  • BIOL 204, 205, 206 (continues into second year)
  • ENG 101
  • MATH (pre-calculus or calculus, depending upon major)
  • PSY 101
  • General University Requirements

Premed students should also seek advising in their major department.

Advisors: Dr. George Kriz, Director of Advising for Pre-Healthcare Professions, George.Kriz@wwu.edu; Renée Murray and Anna Tognazzini, Graduate and Pre-Professional Programs Advisors, Renee.Murray@wwu.edu, Anna.Tognazzini@wwu.edu; Old Main 280, 360-650-4240; www.wwu.edu/careers/prehealth.shtml.

Nursing

Many Western students enter nursing programs by transferring to a nursing program or by entering a nursing program after graduation. Registered Nurse (R.N.) credentials are obtained after successfully completing a state board examination following completion of a certified nursing program at the community college Associate of Science in Nursing (ASN), also known as an Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN), a four-year university (BSN) or direct-entry Masters of Science (MSN) program. (A ‘direct entry masters’ is a master’s degree that accepts students who have a bachelor’s degree, but do not have a RN credential. Some MSN programs, such as University of Washington’s are only for students who already are RNs). To be eligible for a nursing education program, students must complete a specified set of prerequisites and obtain volunteer or paid health care experience. Students may work on completing the prerequisites at WWU and apply for entry into the ASN or BSN program, with or without a degree at WWU. Completion of a degree is required for the direct-entry MSN program. Western offers an RN-to-BSN program for nurses who have already obtained RN credentials, and subsequently wish to obtain a Bachelor’s degree in nursing (BSN). Information on Western’s RN-to-BSN program is available at the Woodring College of Education website: wce.wwu.edu/bsn/rn-bsn-program.

Information on nursing education programs can be obtained from: the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing, www.acenursing.org, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, www.aacn.nche.edu/students, and www.allnursingschools.com.

Pre-Nursing is not a major at WWU. Examples of Western majors that cover some or all of the prerequisites include: Biology-Anthropology, Biology, Community Health, and Kinesiology/Pre-Healthcare Professions.

Volunteer work: It is recommended that students obtain minimally 200 hours of volunteer or paid health care experience. It is also recommended that students consider obtaining the Certified Nursing Assistant license via a local technical or community college.

Courses which are common to many prerequisite requirements for nursing programs:

  • BIOL 101 or 204, 205
  • BIOL 245 or 345, 346
  • BIOL 348, 349
  • CHEM 121, 251
  • ENG 101, 202
  • PSY 101, 230
  • HLED 350
  • ANTH 201, 424
  • Statistics

Advisors: Dr. George Kriz, Director of Advising for Pre-healthcare Professions, George.Kriz@wwu.edu; Renee Murray and Anna Tognazzini, Graduate and Pre-Professional Programs Advisors, Renee.Murray@wwu.edu; Anna.Tognazzini@wwu.edu; OM 280, 360-650-4240; www.wwu.edu/careers/prehealth.shtml.

Nutrition

The Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education (CADE) is the American Dietetic Association (ADA) accrediting agency for education programs preparing students for careers as registered dietitians or dietetic technicians, registered. Only graduates of CADE-accredited programs are eligible to take the exam to become a Registered Dietitian or Dietetic Technician, Registered. Individuals who only have degrees in nutrition, dietetics or other related areas from programs that are not CADE-accredited are not eligible to take the exam to become a Registered Dietitian (RD) or Dietetic Technician, Registered. If a person is not a RD, they are not eligible for many jobs in the nutrition field. WWU is not CADE-accredited. WWU students wishing to become nutritionist must continue their education at a CADE-accredited program at another school.

CADE accredited programs, and other information on becoming a RD can be obtained at: www.eatright.org/students/education/accreditedprograms.aspx.

Courses which are common to many prerequisite requirements for nutrition programs:

  • BIOL 204, 205, 245
  • BIOL 348, 349
  • CHEM 121, 122, 123, 251, 375
  • PSY 101
  • HLED 350

Advisors: Dr. Gordon Chalmers, ET 275, 360-650-3113, Gordon.Chalmers@wwu.edu; Dr. Dave Suprak, CV 105, 360-650-2586, Dave.Suprak@wwu.edu.

Pre-nutrition advising webpage: myweb.facstaff.wwu.edu/chalmers/PDFs/Pre-Nutrition%20Advising%20Sheet.pdf.

Occupational Therapy

Students prepare for entry to a graduate program in occupational therapy by obtaining a baccalaureate degree, completing the prerequisite course work for entry into specific programs, and by obtaining a broad variety of volunteer clinical experience under the direction of an occupational therapist. Students may complete undergraduate degrees in any area. Most programs require submission of scores for the Graduate Record Exam (GRE - general test only).

Specific information on each occupational therapy program can be obtained from the American Occupational Therapy Association at www.aota.org/Educate/Schools.aspx. Students are encouraged to review prerequisite courses early in their academic planning and to develop a plan of study within the first quarter of entry to Western.

Pre-Occupational Therapy is not a major at WWU. Examples of Western majors that cover some or all of the prerequisites include: Biology-Anthropology, Community Health and Kinesiology/Pre-Healthcare Professions.

Courses which are common prerequisites to many occupational therapy programs:

  • PSY 101, 230, 250
  • BIOL 204, 205
  • BIOL 348, 349
  • CHEM 121, 122
  • PHYSICS 101
  • MATH 240, KIN 307 or BIOL 340

Advisors: Dr. Gordon Chalmers, ET 275, 360-650-3113, Gordon.Chalmers@wwu.edu; Dr. Dave Suprak, CV 105, 360-650-2586, Dave.Suprak@wwu.edu.

Pre-occupational therapy advising webpage: www.wwu.edu/alliedhealth/Pre-Occupational%20Therapy.shtml.

Optometry

Twenty-one accredited optometry programs in the U.S. offer the Doctor of Optometry (OD). Admission into an optometry program is highly selective and includes evaluation of GPA, letters of recommendation, scores from the Optometry Admission Test (OAT), an interview, and demonstrated exposure to the profession. Specific schools and their requirements may be accessed from the Association of Schools & Colleges of Optometry (ASCO), www.opted.org.

A strong and broad undergraduate academic background in Chemistry, Biology, Mathematics, Physics, English and Psychology is emphasized yet no specific major is preferred. Students may pursue a major of any area of interest while still acquiring the background necessary to prepare for the Optometry Admission Test (OAT) and to pursue an optometry curriculum. The OAT must be taken at least one full year prior to admission to optometry school; normally it is taken in the junior year.

Early consultation with the pre-healthcare professions advisors is strongly recommended. Students will find it valuable to engage in early and regular discussions of matters such as selection of a major, course sequences, community service, shadowing, and graduation requirements at Western, as well as optometry school entrance requirements, application procedures, the OAT, mock interview, and other pertinent information.

Typical freshman year curriculum:

  • CHEM 121, 122, 123 (begin 121 as soon as possible)
  • BIOL 204, 205, 206 (continues into the second year)
  • ENG 101
  • MATH 124
  • PSY 101
  • General University Requirements (including public speaking)

Pre-optometry students should also seek advising in their major department.

Advisors: Dr. George Kriz, Director of Advising for Pre-Healthcare Professions, George.Kriz@wwu.edu; Renée Murray and Anna Tognazzini, Graduate and Pre-Professional Programs Advisors, Renee.Murray@wwu.edu, Anna.Tognazzini@wwu.edu; OM 280, 360-650-4240; www.wwu.edu/careers/prehealth.shtml.

Pharmacy

Programs at Washington State University, University of Washington, and other institutions lead to a Doctor of Pharmacy degree. Western provides courses that prepare students for admission to these and other programs. Admission into a pharmacy program is highly selective and includes evaluation of GPA, letters of recommendation, scores from the Pharmacy College Admissions Test (PCAT) or Graduate Record Examination (GRE), and an interview.

Students can pursue almost any area of interest as a major field of study and still acquire the background necessary to prepare for the PCAT (or GRE) and pursue a pharmacy curriculum. The PCAT, required by about 2/3 of pharmacy schools, (or GRE) must be taken prior to admission to pharmacy school; normally it is taken in the junior year.

Because admission requirements at pharmacy programs are highly variable, students are strongly encouraged to seek advisement from the pre-healthcare professions advisors. Students will find it valuable to engage in early and regular discussions of matters such as selection of a major, course sequences, GUR courses, community service, shadowing, and graduation requirements at Western, as well as pharmacy school entrance requirements, application procedures, the PCAT and GRE, mock interview, and other pertinent information.

Typical freshman year curriculum:

  • CHEM 121, 122, 123 (begin 121 as soon as possible)
  • BIOL 204, 205, 206 (continues into the second year)
  • ENG 101
  • MATH 124
  • PSY 101
  • General University Requirements (including public speaking, microeconomics, and logic or ethics)

Pre-Pharmacy students should also seek advising in their major department.

Advisors: Dr. George Kriz, Director of Advising for Pre-Healthcare Professions, George.Kriz@wwu.edu; Renée Murray and Anna Tognazzini, Graduate and Pre-Professional Programs Advisors, Renee.Murray@wwu.edu, Anna.Tognazzini@wwu.edu; OM 280, 360-650-4240; www.wwu.edu/careers/prehealth.shtml.

Physical Therapy

Admission to a graduate program in physical therapy is highly selective. Students prepare for entry by obtaining a baccalaureate degree, completing the prerequisite course work for entry into each specific program, and by obtaining volunteer clinical experience. Students may complete undergraduate degrees in any area. Physical therapy programs are three-year programs offered at the doctoral level.

Admission requirements for entry into a physical therapy program include the completion of a required prerequisite set of courses, three letters of recommendation and the completion of an internship under the direction of a physical therapist (200 to 500 hours). Most programs require submission of scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE — general test only) and some require a minimum score on the two sections of the GRE. The GRE should be taken in the fall quarter of the application year.

Specific information on each program can be obtained from the PT Education link on the American Physical Therapy Association home page at www.apta.org. Program prerequisites, statistics, and curriculums are presented by geographic location. Students are encouraged to review prerequisite courses early in their academic planning and to develop a plan of study within the first quarter of entry to Western.

Courses which are common to many prerequisite requirements for physical therapy programs:

  • BIOL 204, 205
  • BIOL 348, 349
  • CHEM 121, 122, 123
  • PHYS 114, 115, 116
  • PSY 101, 230 or 250
  • Statistics

Advisors: Dr. Gordon Chalmers, ET 275, 360-650-3113, Gordon.Chalmers@wwu.edu; Dr. Dave Suprak, CV 105, 360-650-2586, Dave.Suprak@wwu.edu.

Pre-physical therapy advising webpage: www.wwu.edu/alliedhealth/Pre-Physical%20Therapy.shtml.

Physician Assistant

Students prepare for entry to a physician assistant program by obtaining a baccalaureate degree, completing the prerequisite course work for entry into specific programs, and by obtaining a broad variety of volunteer clinical experience. Students may complete undergraduate degrees in any area.

Information about the field can be obtained from the American Academy of Physician Assistants website www.aapa.org/. Specific information on each physician assistant program can be obtained from listings of entry level PA programs at www.arc-pa.org/acc_programs/ and www.paeaonline.org/index.php?ht=d/ContentDir/pid/255.

Courses which are common to many prerequisite requirements for physician assistant programs:

  • BIOL 204, 205
  • BIOL 245 or 345, 346
  • BIOL 348, 349
  • CHEM 121, 122, 123
  • CHEM 251 or 351, 352, 353
  • CHEM 375
  • PSY 101, 230 and/or 250
  • Statistics

Advisors: Dr. George Kriz, Director of Advising for Pre-healthcare Professions, George.Kriz@wwu.edu; Renee Murray and Anna Tognazzini, Graduate and Pre-Professional Programs Advisors, Renee.Murray@wwu.edu; Anna.Tognazzini@wwu.edu; OM 280, 360-650-4240; www.wwu.edu/careers/prehealth.shtml.

Veterinary Medicine

Washington State University and 29 other U.S. veterinary medical colleges offer the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM).  Admission into a veterinary medicine program is highly selective and includes evaluation of GPA, Graduate Record Exam (GRE), extracurricular and community service, volunteer experience within the field, letters of recommendation and an interview. Western offers coursework that will satisfy the pre-requisites of most DVM programs.

Students can pursue almost any area of interest as a major field of study and still acquire the background necessary to prepare for the GRE and pursue a veterinary medicine curriculum. The GRE must be taken at least one full year prior to admission to veterinary medical school; normally it is taken in the junior year.

Because admission requirements at veterinary medical schools are highly variable students are strongly encouraged to seek advisement from the pre-healthcare professions advisors. Early and ongoing consultation with the advisors is strongly recommended to discuss matters such as selection of a major, course sequences, community service, shadowing, graduation requirements, application procedures, the GRE, mock interview, and other pertinent information.

Typical freshman year curriculum:

  • CHEM 121, 122, 123 (begin 121 as soon as possible)
  • BIOL 204, 205, 206 (continues into second year)
  • ENG 101
  • MATH 124
  • General University Requirements (Public speaking beneficial for approximately 1/2 of the Veterinary Medicine schools).

Pre-veterinary students should also seek advising in their major department.

Advisors: Dr. George Kriz, Director of Advising for Pre-Healthcare Professions, George.Kriz@wwu.edu; Renée Murray and Anna Tognazzini, Graduate and Pre-Professional Programs Advisors, Renee.Murray@wwu.edu, Anna.Tognazzini@wwu.edu; OM 280, 360-650-3268; www.wwu.edu/careers/prehealth.shtml.

Professional Transfer Programs

Students who plan to complete a baccalaureate program at another institution should seek advice from that institution for curriculum planning, test requirements and information on application procedures.

The institution to which the student is transferring determines admission to the program and makes decisions regarding the transferability of credit.

Programs undergo constant revision. The student, therefore, must bear responsibility for continued contact with the transfer institution.