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  Jul 24, 2017
 
 
    
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2011-2012 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

All-University Programs


Return to: Interdisciplinary Studies

 

Western Washington University is organized into seven colleges and a Graduate School. This organization not only accommodates Western’s size and complexity, but also enables flexibility and innovation in Western’s curriculum.

Some programs at Western are available through one department or college; some are interdisciplinary, involving several academic units; and some, the All-University Programs listed below, involve all or most of Western’s departments and colleges.

Center for International Studies

360-650-7544
http://www.wwu.edu/international/

The Center for International Studies provides a focus for international education at Western. Its mission is to foster international and global perspectives for all Western students, faculty, and staff through courses, international experiences and study abroad. 

The Center for International Studies coordinates and provides leadership for the activities of six international education units on campus: 

Asia University America Program

The WWU-Asia University America Program (AUAP) is an English language and cultural orientation program that has been developed cooperatively with Asia University (Tokyo, Japan), Central Washington University, and Eastern Washington University. During this five-month study-abroad program, students from Asia University attend AUAP courses at Western in English as a Second Language, American cultural studies, and physical education. AUAP students earn credit from Asia University and are not matriculated at Western. Approximately 80 AUAP students come to Western each year, with sessions running from September to mid-February, and late February through late July.

The AUAP offers a number of opportunities to the Western community:

  • Language and cultural exchange opportunities to Western students and community residents through the Campus Friends, Community Friends, and Classroom Volunteer programs; these programs provide intercultural contacts both within and beyond the classroom
  • Informational programming about Japanese culture in various Western classes and residence-hall groups; in addition, AUAP staff facilitate exchanges with AUAP and regular Western classes
  • Interaction with Japanese students on a daily basis in their halls and dining rooms for Western students who share residence halls with AUAP students
  • Paid leadership positions for Western students, such as international peer advisors and curriculum assistants, that give valuable experience in an intercultural context, provide opportunities to develop international friendships, and assist in financing their education
  • Cultural-exchange services to the community, including programming in Bellingham public schools which introduces local elementary school children to Japanese language and culture and, most importantly, to international friendship
  • Participation by Western faculty and students in research opportunities through AUAP; faculty and students from the communications, foreign languages, psychology, business, and anthropology departments have conducted studies based on linguistic or attitudinal surveys of AUAP students

For more information on the AUAP, contact the office at 360-650-3922; by fax at 360-650-2284; by e-mail at auap@wwu.edu; or visit the AUAP website at www.wwu.edu/~auap.

Center for Canadian-American Studies

The Canadian-American Studies major and minor are designed to expand knowledge of Canada and understanding of Canadian-American issues such as border security, trade relations, environmental policy and cultural differences. Canadian-American studies combines well with other majors and minors to add depth and international expertise. The major (50 credits) is designed to be combined with a second major in fields such as political science, economics, history, geography, environmental studies and French.

The Canadian-American studies curriculum prepares students for positions in firms, agencies, and organizations involved with Canada. Examples include combinations with international business, marketing, political science, geography, environmental policy and other specialties for employment in firms doing business in Canada or with Canadians. Persons interested in working in international non-governmental organizations will find the program to be of substantial value. Canadian-American studies has a strong interdisciplinary orientation.

Opportunities for study and internships in Alberta, British Columbia, Ontario, and Quebec are available.

For more information on Canadian-American Studies contact the office at 360-650-3728; by email at canam@wwu.edu; or visit the Canadian American Studies website at www.wwu.edu/canam/.

Center for East Asian Studies

The Center for East Asian Studies provides a focal point for the University’s interaction with East Asia and for academic study of the region. The program in East Asian studies emphasizes the interdisciplinary study of the area, primarily the countries of China, Japan, Korea and Mongolia. The course of study is designated to attain three major objectives. First, it offers students an opportunity to acquire accurate detailed and comprehensive knowledge of a region that is becoming increasingly important in world affairs. Second, it prepares students who are attracted by job opportunities related to East Asia in business and government. For those who wish to teach about East Asia, the program provides appropriate preparation. Third, it provides solid undergraduate training for students who plan to enter East Asian programs for graduate studies.

For more information on East Asian studies contact Dr. Ed Vajda at 360-650-4856; by email at Edward.Vajda@wwu.edu; or visit the website at www.wwu.edu/eas/

Intensive English Program

The Intensive English Program (IEP) provides a variety of English language courses designed to prepare international students for academic study at American colleges and universities. IEP classes, which are mostly noncredit, focus on preparing students for these academic experiences, as well as helping them to adapt socially and culturally to living in the U.S. The program emphasizes creating opportunities for Western students and IEP students to interact, both in the classroom and through informal conversational situations.

The IEP, in cooperation with the Office of Admissions, manages the Academic English Program, in which international students, as admitted undergraduates, enroll in a combination of regular academic classes and advanced English-language classes. The Academic English Program functions as a bridging process from ESL to university coursework and is designed to better prepare international students for study in degree programs.

Other links to academic areas of the University include the following:

  • IEP works with Western faculty to facilitate intercultural experiences for current Western students in communications, management, psychology, anthropology, education and foreign languages courses by arranging joint classes, projects and other interactions with IEP students
  • IEP is closely linked to the TESOL certificate program by providing practicum experience, tutoring experience and employment opportunities for TESOL students
  • IEP provides opportunities for Western faculty who have professional relationships in other countries to bring students, individually or in groups, to campus for language and content-area study or for eventual matriculation into Western

For more information, contact the IEP office at 360-650-3755; by fax at (360) 650-6818; or by e-mail at iep@wwu.edu, or visit the website at www.wwu.edu/depts/iep/

International Programs and Exchanges

Study Abroad

International Programs and Exchanges (IPE) administers and cooperates in more than 100 international study abroad programs in Asia, Europe, Latin America, Oceania and Africa.  A variety of study abroad, exchange and international internship options are available for a quarter, semester, year-round or a few weeks.  Qualified students for all study abroad and international exchange programs are concurrently enrolled at the University and at the host university or institution, earn WWU credit, and maintain financial aid eligibility and residency.

Faculty-led and international study courses within departments are normally assigned X37 course numbers. At the completion of a study abroad or exchange program, credits for course work may be applied to major, minor, or electives towards graduation.  Since special application and registration procedures are required for participation in study abroad or exchange programs, it is important to contact IPE well in advance of the program deadline.

IPE, in collaboration with EESP, provides support to the development and implementation of faculty-led programs.  IPE also provides administrative support to the International Programs and Advisory Committee (IPAC).

International Students, Faculty and Scholars

IPE serves international students, faculty and scholars at Western by providing advising, programs, and preparation and maintenance of immigration records.  IPE also assists with resolving financial, academic, employment and personal difficulties in coordination with other university offices and community resources.

Program information and advising are available from International Programs and Exchanges, College Hall 104, 360-650-3298, ipe@wwu.edu; www.wwu.edu/ipe.

Korea University Program

Western’s Korea University Cultural Program offers students from Korea University’s Sejong Campus an opportunity to study English in a non-credit program and to experience American culture while living on campus. Cultural Program participants study an intensive program to improve their English speaking, listening, writing and reading skills with the goal of returning to Korea University to complete their degree.

The Korea University Program offers opportunities for Korean students to connect with American students and to enrich the greater Bellingham community through the following activities:

  • Korean students join a family for the “Dinner Club”, sharing their cultures with each other
  • Excursions to local and regional areas of cultural interest, joined by WWU faculty, staff and students
  • Cultural exchanges between Korean students and local school children to promote international understanding
  • Provide classroom experience and employment opportunities for TESOL students

Program information and advising are available from Korea University Program, College Hall 132, 360-650-7754, cis@wwu.edu; www.wwu.edu/kup

The Center also oversees the International Studies Minor, sponsors lectures and presentations on topical global issues and concerns, provides support to incoming international students and visiting scholars, and assists Western faculty members in developing new international teaching, learning and research opportunities. The Center for International Studies is responsible for: 

  • Curriculum Development - The Center assists all university departments in developing internationally focused courses and learning experiences for students. The Center provides administrative support to the International Curriculum Committee. Other support includes seed grants for course development, faculty workshops, and assistance in building short-term courses taught by Western faculty abroad. http://www.wwu.edu/international/  
  • International Activities on Campus - The Center sponsors cultural and educational activities and programs for the campus community, including those associated with International Education Week, Canada Week, Japan Week and the World Issues Forum. The Center also hosts seminars on current international education issues. http://www.wwu.edu/international/
  • Quarterly International Studies Lecture Series - The Center sponsors lectures and presentations by both visiting and resident scholars during the academic year, focusing on regions as diverse as Quebec and Mongolia. Topics range from international trade to global literature and current world political events. http://www.wwu.edu/international/
  • Links to the Community - The Center fosters collaboration and partnerships with a wide variety of governmental and civic organizations, including Bellingham Sister Cities, Rotary Club, Slum Doctor Programme, Bellingham School District, and Whatcom Community College. http://www.wwu.edu/international/
  • Study Abroad - Through International Programs and Exchanges, the Center promotes a wide array of study abroad programs, and is committed to finding ways to make the study abroad experiences accessible to all Western students. The Center supports those international programs that give students a chance to broaden their global perspectives, gain foreign language fluency, engage in service learning and volunteer opportunities, and acquire global citizenship skills. http://www.wwu.edu/ipe/abroad.shtml
  • International Students - The Center organizes and promotes activities for Western’s population of international students, provides venues for international students to meet and interact with the campus community. http://www.wwu.edu/international/

Center for Service-Learning

360-650-7542
www.wwu.edu/depts/csl

Service-learning is an experiential learning method in which students learn through active participation in meaningful service experiences that meet community needs. Service-learning offers students the opportunity to learn outside the classroom, explore the richness and diversity of their community, and examine social justice issues, while applying classroom theory in a real-world setting.

The Center for Service-Learning provides resources, including training and technical assistance, to students, faculty, and community partner organizations.

Western offers many courses that include service-learning; contact the Center to learn more.

Field Experience Programs

Western Washington University recognizes that work experience outside of the classroom can enhance student learning by providing opportunities to put theory into practice. To this end, the University works closely with a wide variety of businesses and community and governmental agencies which offer internship opportunities, and many academic departments require or make academic credit available for field experience.

Students interested in exploring field experience opportunities should contact the Career Services Center, Old Main 280.

Post-Baccalaureate Professional Schools

Admission to graduate professional schools requires a baccalaureate degree and is competitive. Early consultation with the relevant advisor and excellent academic work are crucial to success.

Dentistry

Admission to dental schools is highly selective and includes evaluation of GPA, letters of recommendation, scores from the Dental Admission Test (DAT), and an interview, as well as demonstrated dental knowledge and community service.

Course requirements for entry into a dental program afford each applicant an opportunity to pursue almost any area of interest as a major field of study and still acquire the background necessary to prepare for the DAT and to pursue a dental curriculum. The DAT must be taken the year prior to admission to dental school; normally it is taken in the junior year.

Typical freshman year curriculum:

  • CHEM 121, 122, 123 (begin 121 as soon as possible)
  • BIOL 204, 205, 206 (continues into second year)
  • ENG 101
  • MATH (pre-calculus or calculus, depending upon major)

Early consultation with a pre-professional advisor is strongly recommended. Students will find it valuable to engage in early and regular discussions of matters such as selection of a major, course sequences, community service, and graduation requirements at Western, as well as dental school entrance requirements and application procedures, the DAT, and other pertinent information.

Advisors: Dr. George Kriz, Director of Advising for Pre-Healthcare Professions, George.Kriz@wwu.edu; Renée Murray, Graduate and Pre-Professional Programs Advisor, Renee.Murray@wwu.edu; Old Main 280M, 360-650-3268, careers@wwu.edu.

Law

Law schools require a baccalaureate degree. They do not require a specific undergraduate major, but do seek students who are broadly educated. Admission is selective based primarily on GPA, LSAT scores and letters of recommendation. Law schools want students who excel in oral and written communication; understand economic, political and social institutions; and have well-developed objective and critical thinking skills. Western’s General University Requirements are intended to aid students in honing these skills.

The Law School Admission Test (LSAT), normally required of applicants to American and Canadian law schools, is offered on the Western campus several times each year. Applications and test schedule information may be obtained from the Testing Center and the Department of Political Science. Students should plan to take the LSAT late in their junior year or early in their senior year.

Advisors: Dr. Paul Chen, Department of Political Science, Arntzen Hall 436, 360-650-4876, Paul.Chen@wwu.edu; Julie Helling, Fairhaven College, FA 333, 360-650-4907, Julie.Helling@wwu.edu.

Medicine

The faculties of the School of Medicine at the University of Washington and other medical schools in the U.S. believe that the appropriate level of scholarly achievement and preparation for medicine can best be developed in a liberal arts program with the emphasis on a discipline selected by the student.

In recognition of the diverse opportunities afforded the graduate in medicine, specified entrance requirements are purposely kept to a minimum. This enables each student to pursue, as a major field of study, almost any area of interest — the arts, humanities, social sciences, biological or physical sciences — and still acquire the background necessary to prepare for the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) and to pursue a medical curriculum. The MCAT must be taken at least one full year prior to the date of admission to medical school; normally it is taken in the junior year.

Early consultation with the pre-professional advisor is strongly recommended. Students will find it valuable to engage in early and regular discussions of matters such as selection of a major, course sequences, community service, and graduation requirements at Western, as well as medical school entrance requirements and application procedures, MCAT and other pertinent information.

Typical freshman year curriculum:

  • CHEM 121, 122, 123 (begin 121 as soon as possible)
  • BIOL 204, 205, 206 (continues into second year)
  • ENG 101
  • MATH 124 and 125
  • PSY 101
  • General University Requirements

Premed students should also seek advising in their major department.

Advisors: Dr. George Kriz, Director of Advising for Pre-Healthcare Professions, George.Kriz@wwu.edu; Renée Murray, Graduate and Pre-Professional Programs Advisor, Renne.Murray@wwu.edu; Old Main 280, 360-650-3268, careers@wwu.edu; http://www.careers.wwu.edu/prehealth.shtml.

Pharmacy

Programs at Washington State University, University of Washington, and other institutions lead to a Doctor of Pharmacy degree. Western provides courses that prepare students for admission to these programs. Admission into a pharmacy program is highly selective and includes evaluation of GPA, letters of recommendation, scores from the Pharmacy College Admissions Test (PCAT) or Graduate Record Examination (GRE), and an interview. Because admission requirements at pharmacy programs are highly variable students are strongly encouraged to seek advisement from the pre-healthcare professions advisors.

Typical freshman year curriculum:

  • CHEM 121, 122, 123 (begin 121 as soon as possible)
  • BIOL 204, 205, 206 (continues into the second year)
  • ENG 101
  • Math 124
  • General University Requirements

Advisors: Dr. George Kriz, Director of Advising for Pre-Healthcare Professions, George.Kriz@wwu.edu; Renée Murray, Graduate and Pre-Professional Programs Advisor, Renee.Murray@wwu.edu; OM 280, 360-650-3268, careers@wwu.edu.

Physical Therapy

Admission to a graduate program in physical therapy is highly selective. Students prepare for entry by obtaining a baccalaureate degree, completing the prerequisite course work for entry into each specific program, and by obtaining volunteer clinical experience. Students may complete undergraduate degrees in any area. Most physical therapy programs are three-year programs offered at the doctoral level.

Admission requirements for entry into a physical therapy program include the completion of a required prerequisite set of courses, three letters of recommendation and the completion of volunteer job shadowing under the direction of a physical therapist (200 to 500 hours). Most programs require submission of scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE — general test only) and some require a minimum score on the two sections of the GRE. The GRE should be taken in the fall quarter of the application year.

Specific information on each program can be obtained from the PT Education link on the American Physical Therapy Association home page at www.apta.org. Program prerequisites, statistics, and curriculums are presented by geographic location. Students are encouraged to review prerequisite courses early in their academic planning and to develop a plan of study within the first quarter of entry to Western.

Courses which are common to many prerequisite requirements for physical therapy programs:

  • BIOL 101; or 204, 205
  • BIOL 245 (depending on PT schools being prepared for)
  • BIOL 3348, 349 
  • CHEM 121, 122, 123
  • PHYS 114, 115, 116
  • PSY 101, 230 or 250
  • Statistics

Advisors: Dr. Gordon Chalmers, ET 275, 360-650-3113, Gordon.Chalmers@wwu.edu; Dr. Brandi Row, CV 24, 360-650-4277, Brandi.Row@wwu.edu; Dr. Dave Suprak, CV 105, 360-650-2586, Dave.Suprak@wwu.edu

To schedule a meeting with an advisor contact: Kate Kairoff (CV 102, kate.kairoff@wwu.edu, 360-650-3505) and she will assign you to an advisor. Then you should contact your assigned advisor to schedule an appointment.

Pre-physical therapy advising webpage: http://www.wwu.edu/alliedhealth/Pre-Physical%20Therapy.shtml

Nursing

Western does not offer a nursing education program but many Western students enter nursing programs by transferring to a nursing program or by entering a nursing program after graduation. Registered Nurse (R.N.) credentials are obtained after successfully completing a state board examination following completion of a certified nursing program at the community college (Associate of Science in Nursing (ASN), also known as a Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN), a four-year university (BSN) or direct-entry Masters of Science (MSN) program. (A ‘direct entry masters’ is a masters degree that accepts students who have a bachelors degree, but do not have a RN credential. Some MSN programs, such as University of Washington’s are only for students who already are RNs). To be eligible for a nursing education program, students must complete a specified set of prerequisites and obtain volunteer or paid health care experience. Students may work on completing the prerequisites at WWU and apply for entry into the ASN or BSN program, with or without a degree at WWU. Completion of a degree is required for the direct-entry MSN program.

Information on nursing education programs can be obtained from: the National League For Nursing Accrediting Commission, www.nlnac.org/Forms/directory_search.htm, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, www.aacn.nche.edu/CCNE/reports/accprog.asp, and www.allnursingschools.com/.

Pre-Nursing is not a major at WWU. Examples of Western majors that cover some or all of the prerequisites include: Biology-Anthropology, Biology, Community Health and Kinesiology/Pre-Healthcare Professions.

The requirements for nursing programs vary on the type of program being prepared for (community college, BSN, Masters) and the requirements of a specific school at any level. For this reason it is important for a Western student to work closely with a pre-nursing advisor to develop a plan of study that includes the appropriate prerequisite courses.

Volunteer work: It is recommended that students obtain 200+ hours of volunteer or paid health care experience. It is also recommended that students consider obtaining the Certified Nursing Assistant license via a local technical or community college.

Advisors: Dr. Gordon Chalmers, ET 275, 360-650-3113, Gordon.Chalmers@wwu.edu; Dr. Brandi Row, CV 24, 360-650-4277, Brandi.Row@wwu.edu; Dr. Dave Suprak, CV 105, 360-650-2586, Dave.Suprak@wwu.edu

To schedule a meeting with an advisor contact: Kate Kairoff (CV 102, kate.kairoff@wwu.edu, 360-650-3505) and she will assign you to an advisor. Then you should contact your assigned advisor to schedule an appointment.

Pre-nursing advising webpage: http://www.wwu.edu/alliedhealth/Pre-Nursing.shtml

Occupational Therapy

Students prepare for entry to a graduate program in occupational therapy by obtaining a baccalaureate degree, completing the prerequisite course work for entry into specific programs, and by obtaining a broad variety of volunteer clinical experience under the direction of an occupational therapist. Students may complete undergraduate degrees in any area. Most programs require submission of scores for the Graduate Record Exam (GRE - general test only).

Specific information on each occupational therapy program can be obtained from the American Occupational Therapy Association at www.aota.org/Educate/Schools.aspx. Students are encouraged to review prerequisite courses early in their academic planning and to develop a plan of study within the first quarter of entry to Western.

Pre-Occupational Therapy is not a major at WWU.  Examples of Western majors that cover some or all of the prerequisites include: Biology-Anthropology, Community Health and Kinesiology/Pre-Healthcare Professions.

Courses which are common prerequisites to many occupational therapy programs:

  • PSY 101, 230, 250
  • BIOL 101 OR 204, 205
  • BIOL 348, 349
  • CHEM 121, 122 
  • PHYSICS 114, 115 
  • MATH 240, KIN 307 or BIOL 340

Advisors: Dr. Gordon Chalmers, ET 275, 360-650-3113, Gordon.Chalmers@wwu.edu; Dr. Brandi Row, CV 24, 360-650-4277, Brandi.Row@wwu.edu; Dr. Dave Suprak, CV 105, 360-650-2586, Dave.Suprak@wwu.edu

To schedule a meeting with an advisor contact: Kate Kairoff (CV 102, kate.kairoff@wwu.edu, 360-650-3505) and she will assign you to an advisor. Then you should contact your assigned advisor to schedule an appointment.

Pre-occupational therapy advising webpage: http://www.wwu.edu/alliedhealth/Pre-Occupational%20Therapy.shtml

Professional Transfer Programs

Students who plan to complete a baccalaureate program at another institution should seek advice from that institution for curriculum planning, test requirements and information on application procedures. The Western advisor listed below is also available to students.

The institution to which the student is transferring determines admission to the program and makes decisions regarding the transferability of credit.

Programs undergo constant revision. The student, therefore, must bear responsibility for continued contact with the transfer institution.

Engineering

Western provides two curricular paths to a career in engineering. The Two-Plus-Two program requires two years of study at Western Washington University followed by two or more years of study at an engineering college.

The second path is a dual degree program the Three-Two program, that requires three years at Western Washington University followed by two years of study at the College of Engineering at the University of Washington. At the conclusion of this five-year program students will receive two degrees: the Bachelor of Arts from Western and the Bachelor of Science in Engineering from the University of Washington.

The primary purpose of both pre-engineering programs is to provide a strong fundamental education in science and mathematics, to develop skills necessary for success at an engineering college. In addition to courses in science and mathematics, engineering schools and colleges also require additional courses distributed in social sciences and humanities, which can be selected from Western’s offerings, to meet the requirements of the specific engineering school to which the student intends to transfer. Note that most engineering schools specify a minimum number of credits completed and a competitive grade point average for admission to a given engineering program.

Pre-Engineering Program

While at Western, students may complete two years of courses in science and mathematics, and other areas depending upon the engineering field of interest. The choice of courses should be tailored to meet the requirements of the engineering school to which the student plans to transfer. Transfer generally occurs after two years of study.

Three-Two Dual Degree Program

Western cooperates with the College of Engineering of the University of Washington in a program of engineering education based upon a broad foundation of liberal arts. The program consists of three years at Western Washington University followed by two years in the College of Engineering at the University of Washington. The nature of the program makes it difficult to pursue by students who do not begin at Western as freshmen. A minimum of 135 credits must be completed prior to leaving Western for the University of Washington, and at least 90 of these must be earned at Western.

While at Western, students may complete the pre-engineering courses listed below and take General University Requirements in communications, humanities, social sciences, non-Western and minority cultural studies, math and science for the Bachelor of Arts degree. Upon successful completion of the program the student will receive the Bachelor of Arts from Western and the Bachelor of Science in Engineering from the University of Washington. This two-degree program provides an excellent liberal arts, mathematics and science background prior to specialization in engineering. The combined program is competitive and designed specifically for students who have strong preparation in communication skills, mathematics and science.

The curriculum does not guarantee admission to the College of Engineering at the University of Washington. Entrance to the University of Washington is competitive, so students must maintain a sufficient grade point average in order to gain admission to the University of Washington.

Introductory core courses

All pre-engineering students, regardless of intended engineering field, should take:

  • CHEM 121
  • ENG 101
  • MATH 124, 125, 204, 224, 331
  • PHYS 121, 122, 123, 223, 233 (the entire sequence of 121, 122, 123 and 223 should be completed to minimize transfer problems)
  • CSCI 140 or 141 (check with engineering program you intend to transfer to and take the CSCI course with the appropriate computer language)
  • 15 credits of Humanities and Social Sciences (at least one course in each)

Students interested in mechanical, civil, aeronautical, industrial, or manufacturing engineering or materials science or engineering should also take CHEM 122 and ETEC 110, 224, 225, and 226.

Students interested in electrical or computer engineering may also take ETEC 271, 273, and 274, but students should be aware that these courses are unlikely to transfer.

Students interested in chemical or biomedical engineering should also take CHEM 122, 123, 351, 352 and check with the engineering program of interest to see if any biology is appropriate as well.

Check with the pre-engineering advisor for additional courses.

Students not prepared to take Mathematics 124 (Calculus) should enroll in a preparatory sequence, under advisement.

Program advisor: Dr. Jeffrey L. Newcomer, Department of Engineering Technology, ET 309, 360-650-7239, Jeff.Newcomer@wwu.edu.

Return to: Interdisciplinary Studies